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Windows 2012 Hosting :: Hyper-v 3.0 Network Virtualization on Windows 2012

clock August 28, 2013 10:21 by author Mike

Windows Server introduces a slew of new technologies. These technologies enable Windows Server systems and virtual environments to meet all manner of new requirements and scenarios, including private and public cloud implementations. Often, this type of scenario involves a single infrastructure that's shared by different business units or even different organizations. 

In this article, I want to describe Network virtualization. Other great capabilities include a new site-to-site VPN solution; huge enhancements to the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, enabling VMs to run from a Server 8 file share; native NIC teaming; and consistent device naming. But I want to focus on the major network technologies that most affect virtualization.

Virtualization has always striven to abstract one resource layer from another, giving improved functionality and portability. But networking hasn't embraced this goal, and VMs are tied to the networking configuration on the host that runs them. Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager (VMM) 2012 tries to link VMs to physical networks through its logical networks feature, which lets you create logical networks such as Development, Production, and Backup. You can then create IP subnets and virtual LANs (VLANs) for each physical location that has a connection to a logical network. This capability lets you create VMs that automatically connect to the Production network, for example; VMM works out the actual Hyper-V switch that should be used and the IP scheme and VLAN tag, based on the actual location to which the VM is deployed.

This feature is great. But it still doesn't help in scenarios in which I might be hosting multiple tenants that require their own IP schemes, or even one tenant that requires VMs to move between different locations or between private and public clouds, without changing IP addresses or policies that relate to the network. Typically, public cloud providers require clients to use the hosted IP scheme, which is an issue for flexible migration between on-premises and off-premises hosting.

Both these scenarios require the network to be virtualized, and the virtual network must believe that it wholly owns the network fabric, in the same way that a VM believes it owns the hardware on which it runs. VMs don't see other VMs, and virtual networks shouldn't see or care about other virtual networks on the same physical fabric, even when they have overlapping IP schemes. Network isolation is a crucial part of network virtualization, especially when you consider hosted scenarios. If I'm hosting Pepsi and Coca-Cola on the same physical infrastructure, I need to be very sure that they can't see each other's virtual networks. They need complete network isolation.

This virtual network capability is enabled through the use of two IP addresses for each VM and a virtual subnet identifier that indicates the virtual network to which a particular VM belongs. The first IP address is the standard address that's configured within the VM and is referred to as the customer address (using IEEE terms). The second IP address is the address that the VM communicates over the physical network and is known as the provider address.

In the example that Figure 1 shows, we have one physical fabric. Running on that fabric are two separate organizations: red and blue. Each organization has its own IP scheme, which can overlap, and the virtual networks can span multiple physical locations. Each VM that is part of the virtual red or blue network has its own customer address. A separate provider address is used to send the actual IP traffic over the physical fabric.

Figure 1: Virtual networking example


Figure 1: Virtual networking example 

You can see that the physical fabric has the network and compute resources and that multiple VMs run across the hosts and sites. The color of the VM coordinates with its virtual network (red or blue). Even though the VMs are distributed across hosts and locations, the hosts in the virtual networks are completely isolated from the other virtual networks with their own IP schemes.

Two solutions-IP rewrite and Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE)-enable network virtualization in Server 8. Both solutions allow completely separate virtual networks with their own IP schemes (which can overlap) to run over one shared fabric.

IP rewrite. The first option is IP rewrite, which does exactly what the name suggests. Each VM has two IP addresses: a customer address, which is configured within the VM, and a provider address, which is used for the actual packet transmission over the network. The Hyper-V switch looks at the traffic that the VM is sending out, looks at the virtual subnet ID to identify the correct virtual network, and rewrites the IP address source and target from the customer addresses to the corresponding provider addresses. This approach requires many IP addresses from the provider address pool because every VM needs its own provider address. The good news is that because the IP packet isn't being modified (apart from the address), hardware offloads such as virtual machine queue (VMQ), checksum, and receive-side scaling (RSS) continue to function. IP rewrite adds very little overhead to the network process and gives very high performance.

Figure 2 shows the IP rewrite process, along with the mapping table that the Hyper-V host maintains. The Hyper-V host maintains the mapping of customer-to-provider addresses, each of which is unique for each VM. The source and destination IP addresses of the original packet are changed as the packet is sent via the Hyper-V switch. The arrows in the figure show the flow of IP traffic.

Figure 2: IP rewrite process


Figure 2: IP rewrite process 

GRE. The second option is GRE, an Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard. GRE wraps the originating packet, which uses the customer addresses, inside a packet that can be routed on the physical network by using the provider address and that includes the actual virtual subnet ID. Because the virtual subnet ID is included in the wrapper packet, VMs don't require their own provider addresses. The receiving host can identify the targeted VM based on the target customer address within the original packet and the virtual subnet ID in the wrapper packet. All the Hyper-V host on the originating VM needs to know is which Hyper-V host is running the target VM and can send the packet over the network.

The use of a shared provider address means that far fewer IP addresses from the provider IP pools are needed. This is good news for IP management and the network infrastructure. However, there is a downside, at least as of this writing. Because the original packet is wrapped inside the GRE packet, any kind of NIC offloading will break. The offloads won't understand the new packet format. The good news is that many major hardware manufacturers are in the process of adding support for GRE to all their network equipment, enabling offloading even when GRE is used.

Figure 3 shows the GRE process. The Hyper-V host still maintains the mapping of customer-to-provider address, but this time the provider address is per Hyper-V host virtual switch. The original packet is unchanged. Rather, the packet is wrapped in the GRE packet as it passes through the Hyper-V switch, which includes the correct source and destination provider addresses in addition to the virtual subnet ID.


Figure 3: GRE 

In both technologies, virtualization policies are used between all the Hyper-V hosts that participate in a specific virtual network. These policies enable the routing of the customer address across the physical fabric and track the customer-to-provider address mapping. The virtualization policies can also define the virtual networks that are allowed to communicate with other virtual networks. The virtualization policies can be configured by using Windows PowerShell, which is a common direction for Server 8. This makes sense: When you consider massive scale and automation, the current GUI really isn't sufficient. The challenge when using native PowerShell commands is the synchronous orchestration of the virtual-network configuration across all participating Hyper-V hosts.

Both options sound great, but which one should you use? GRE should be the network virtualization technology of choice because it's faster than IP rewrite. The network hardware supports GRE, which is important because otherwise GRE would break offloading, and software would need to perform offloading, which would be very slow. Also, because of the reduced provider address requirements, GRE places fewer burdens on the network infrastructure. However, until the networking equipment supports GRE, you should use IP rewrite, which requires no changes on the network infrastructure equipment.

 



ASP.NET MVC 4 Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: Build Mobile Applications With ASP.NET MVC 4.5

clock August 20, 2013 05:56 by author Ben

The MVC 4 release is building on a pretty mature base and is able to focus on some more advanced scenarios. Some top features include:

  • ASP.NET Web API
  • Enhancements to default project templates
  • Mobile project template using jQuery Mobile
  • Display Modes
  • Task support for Asynchronous Controllers
  • Bundling and minification

The following sections provide an overview of these features. We’ll be going into them in more detail throughout the book.
Developing MVC 4 applications with Visual Studio 2011 Developers Preview is quite jump-start for developers as it has inbuilt support for JQuery Mobile css & javascripts, nice intellisense for HTML 5 , CSS 3 media queries. MVC 4 developers preview was built keeping in mind the Mobile Web Developers who wants keen support of rich MVC in Mobile Web.

  • Lets start to develop MVC 4 mobile application with JQuery Mobile, HTML5, CSS3 in VS 2011 developers preview.

  • Select your MVC 4 application domain either Internet/Intranet/Mobile Web application  with default Razor or ASPX syntaxes. For my demo , selected Mobile Web application in VS 2011 Developer Preview.

  • Next, write some JQuery Mobile application code to check th UI view in SmartPhones while Model & Controller logic remains same & could change according to business requirements.
  • Database -> Entity Framework (EF) -> Model in MVC 4(Entities) (DAL)-> Controllers (Business Logic Layer)(BLL) -> View(s) -> Master(_Layout.cshtml) is the default development path in MVC 4 Web & mobile application.

  • Next , Check the nice intellisense support for HTML5 , JQuery Mobile in Visual Studio 2011 Developer Preview.

  • Check out the MVC 4 Mobile Web applications with JQuery Mobile , HTML5 , CSS 3 media queries in Smart Devices.
  • JQuery Mobile View in iPhone of MVC 4 Mobile application:

 



Windows 2012 Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: Things to Know About Deduplication in Windows Server 2012

clock August 15, 2013 08:14 by author Jervis

Talk to most administrators about deduplication and the usual response is: Why? Disk space is getting cheaper all the time, with I/O speeds ramping up along with it. The discussion often ends there with a shrug.

But the problem isn’t how much you’re storing or how fast you can get to it. The problem is whether the improvements in storage per gigabyte or I/O throughputs are being outpaced by the amount of data being stored in your organization. The more we can store, the more we do store. And while deduplication is not a magic bullet, it is one of many strategies that can be used to cut into data storage demands.

Microsoft added a deduplication subsystem feature in Windows Server 2012, which provides a way to perform deduplication on all volumes managed by a given instance of Windows Server. Instead of relegating deduplication duty to a piece of hardware or a software layer, it’s done in the OS on both a block and file level — meaning that many kinds of data (such as multiple instances of a virtual machine) can be successfully deduplicated with minimal overhead.

If you plan to implement Windows Server 2012 deduplication technology, be sure you understand these seven points:

1. Deduplication is not enabled by default

Don’t upgrade to Windows Server 2012 and expect to see space savings automatically appear. Deduplication is treated as a file-and-storage service feature, rather than a core OS component. To that end, you must enable it and manually configure it in Server Roles | File And Storage Services | File and iSCSI Services. Once enabled, it also needs to be configured on a volume-by-volume basis.

2. Deduplication won’t burden the system

Microsoft put a fair amount of thought into setting up deduplication so it has a small system footprint and can run even on servers that have a heavy load. Here are three reasons why:

a. Content is only deduplicated after n number of days, with n being 5 by default, but this is user-configurable. This time delay keeps the deduplicator from trying to process content that is currently and aggressively being used or from processing files as they’re being written to disk (which would constitute a major performance hit).

b. Deduplication can be constrained by directory or file type. If you want to exclude certain kinds of files or folders from deduplication, you can specify those as well.

c. The deduplication process is self-throttling and can be run at varying priority levels. You can set the actual deduplication process to run at low priority and it will pause itself if the system is under heavy load. You can also set a window of time for the deduplicator to run at full speed, during off-hours, for example.

This way, with a little admin oversight, deduplication can be put into place on even a busy server and not impact its performance.

3. Deduplicated volumes are ‘atomic units’

‘Atomic units’ mean that all of the deduplication information about a given volume is kept on that volume, so it can be moved without injury to another system that supports deduplication. If you move it to a system that doesn’t have deduplication, you’ll only be able to see the nondeduplicated files. The best rule is not to move a deduplicated volume unless it’s to another Windows Server 2012 machine.

4. Deduplication works with BranchCache

If you have a branch server also running deduplication, it shares data about deduped files with the central server and thus cuts down on the amount of data needed to be sent between the two.

5. Backing up deduplicated volumes can be tricky

A block-based backup solution — e.g., a disk-image backup method — should work as-is and will preserve all deduplication data.

File-based backups will also work, but they won’t preserve deduplication data unless they’re dedupe-aware. They’ll back up everything in its original, discrete, undeduplicated form. What’s more, this means backup media should be large enough to hold the undeduplicated data as well.

The native Windows Server Backup solution is dedupe-aware, although any third-party backup products for Windows Server 2012 should be checked to see if deduplication awareness is either present or being added in a future revision.

6. More is better when it comes to cores and memory

Microsoft recommends devoting at least one CPU core and 350 MB of free memory to process one volume at a time, with around 100 GB of storage processed in an hour (without interruptions) or around 2 TB a day. The more parallelism you have to spare, the more volumes you can simultaneously process.

7. Deduplication mileage may vary

Microsoft has crunched its own numbers and found that the nature of the deployment affected the amount of space savings. Multiple OS instances on virtual hard disks (VHDs) exhibited a great deal of savings because of the amount of redundant material between them; user folders, less so.

In its rundown of what are good and bad candidates for deduping, Microsoft notes that live Exchange Server databases are actually poor candidates. This sounds counterintuitive; you’d think an Exchange mailbox database might have a lot of redundant data in it. But the constantly changing nature of data (messages being moved, deleted, created, etc.) offsets the gains in throughput and storage savings made by deduplication. However, an Exchange Server backup volume is a better candidate since it changes less often and can be deduplicated without visibly slowing things down.

How much you actually get from deduplication in your particular setting is the real test for whether to use it. Therefore, it’s best to start provisionally, perhaps on a staging server where you can set the “crawl rate” for deduplication as high as needed, see how much space savings you get with your data and then establish a schedule for performing deduplication on your own live servers.

 



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