Windows 2012 Hosting - MVC 6 and SQL 2014 BLOG

Tutorial and Articles about Windows Hosting, SQL Hosting, MVC Hosting, and Silverlight Hosting

ASP.NET MVC 4 Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: Multiple Views and DisplayMode Providers in ASP.NET MVC 4

clock April 8, 2013 12:35 by author Jervis

All in all, the biggest difference between ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET Web Forms is the neat separation that exists in ASP.NET MVC between the actions that follows a request and the generation of the subsequent response for the browser.

The request lifecycle In Web Forms was a continuous flow. Firstly, a Page object was created from default settings hard-coded in the ASPX file and then initialized to the last known good state read from the viewstate field. The user code had then a chance to further update the state of the Page object before the postback event was handled and the state of the page to render back to the user was prepared.

All this happened in a single procedure: There was little chance for developers to serve different views in front of the same request. On the other hand, Web Forms is built around the concept of a “page”. If you request a page, you’re going to get “that” page. Subsequently, if you request default.aspx from a site intended for desktop use why should you be expecting to receive a mobile optimized page instead if you’re making the request from a mobile device? If you want a mobile page, you just set up a new mobile site and make it reachable through a different URL. At that point, you have a distinct “page” to invoke and it all works as expected.

Web Forms at some point was also extended with convention-based tricks to automatically serve different master pages to different browsers and also to make server controls capable of returning different values for different browsers. Nevertheless, Web Forms serves the vision of the web world that was mainstream more than a decade ago. Unless you have serious backward compatibility reasons, you should definitely consider making the step forward to ASP.NET MVC; and use ASP.NET MVC for any new development.

Anyway, this article is NOT about the endless debate the relative merits of Web Forms and MVC—there’s really nothing to discuss there. This article is about new features introduced in ASP.NET MVC 4 to make it really easy and effective to serve different views in front of the same request.

Display Modes

Here’s the classic example where display modes fit in. Suppose you have a Home controller with an Index method.

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View();
    }
}

As you know, you should also have a file named index.cshtml located under the Views/Home folder in the project. This file will provide the HTML for the browser. In the body of the Index method above you code (or better, you invoke from other components) the logic required to serve the request. If, by executing this piece of logic, data is produced which needs to be embedded in the view, then you pass this data down to the view object by adding an argument to the View method.

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        var model = ProcessRequestAndGetData();
        return View(model);
    }
}

So far so good.

Now in ASP.NET MVC 4 there’s an extra piece of magic that you might not know about yet. To experience the thrill of it, you add a new file to the Views/Home folder named index.mobile.cshtml. You can give this file any content you like; just make sure the content is different from the aforementioned index.cshtml.

Now launch the sample site and visit it with both a regular desktop browser, Internet Explorer perhaps, and a mobile browser. You can use the Windows Phone emulator or perhaps Opera Emulator. However, the simplest thing you can do to test the feature without much pain is to hit F12 and bring up the IE Developer’s Tools window. From there, you set a fake user agent that matches a mobile device. If you are clueless about what to enter, here’s a suggestion that matches an iPhone running iPhone OS 6:

Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 6_0 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/536.26 (KHTML, like Gecko)

Quite surprisingly, the view you get for the same home/index URL is the mobile view as coded in the file index.mobile.cshtml.

What the heck is going on? Is this pure magic?

Even though I’m a firm believer that there can’t be any magic in software, well, I faced some terrible doubts until I found out about display modes.

Display Modes: Where Are Them?

To spot where display modes are and the role they play, I then used .NET Reflector to statically track the code path starting with the View method on the Controller class. From the View method, the code flow reaches the selected view engine—the RazorViewEngineclass in all cases in which CSHTML views are used. In ASP.NET MVC 4 all standard view engines inherit from the same base class—VirtualPathProviderViewEngine. This class has a new protected property named DisplayModeProvider. This property is of typeDisplayModeProvider. TheVirtualPathProviderViewEngine lists some helper methods through which the view name is resolved. The view engine receives the view name as set at the controller level: it can be name like “index” or it can be the empty string, as in the example above. If no view name is provided the view engine assumes it is the name of the action.

In ASP.NET MVC 4, an extra step takes place in theVirtualPathProviderViewEngine base class from which both WebFormsViewEngine and RazorViewEngine inherit. During the resolution of the view name, the view engine queries theDisplayModeProvider object to see if any of the registered display modes can be applied to the requested view. If a match is found, then the original view name is changed to point to the CSHTML file that represents the match. So, for instance, it may happen that “index” becomes “index.mobile”.

Let’s now explore further the internals of the DisplayModeProvider class.

The DisplayModeProvider Class

The documentation refers to this class as being internal to the framework; however, it has a few public members that you might, and should, be using in order to extend your site with multiple ad hoc views. The class has a static constructor that .NET Reflector decompiles as below:

static DisplayModeProvider()
{
    MobileDisplayModeId = "Mobile";
    DefaultDisplayModeId = string.Empty;
    _displayModeKey = new object();
    _instance = new DisplayModeProvider();
}

And here’s the constructor instead:

internal DisplayModeProvider()
{
    List list = new List();
    DefaultDisplayMode mode = new DefaultDisplayMode(MobileDisplayModeId) {
        ContextCondition = context => context.GetOverriddenBrowser().IsMobileDevice
    };
    list.Add(mode);
    list.Add(new DefaultDisplayMode());
    this._displayModes = list;
}

It turns out that DisplayModeProvider holds a list of DefaultDisplayMode objects each representing a display mode. By default, the provider holds two display modes: default and mobile. The default display mode is characterized by the empty string; the mobile display mode is characterized by the “mobile” string. These strings basically identify the suffix appended to the view name. This is where file name index.mobile.cshtml comes from.

It is interesting to focus on the following code:

DefaultDisplayMode mode = new DefaultDisplayMode(MobileDisplayModeId) {
     ContextCondition = context =>
context.GetOverriddenBrowser().IsMobileDevice
};

In spite of a misleading name, the DefaultDisplayMode class is just the official class that represents a display mode. As I see things, the “Default” prefix in the name is just out of place. A display mode class is built around two main pieces of information: suffix name and matching rule. In the code snippet above, a new display mode class is created with the suffix of “mobile”—the actual value of the MobileDisplayModeIdfield—and a matching rule assigned to the ContextConditionproperty. Property ContextCondition is a delegate as below:

Func<HttpContextBase, Boolean>

The purpose of the delegate is to analyze the HTTP context of the current request and return a Boolean answer to the question: should this display mode be used to serve the current request? How the Boolean response is found is entirely up to the implementation. As defined above, the mobile display mode parses the user agent string that comes with the request and seeks to find known keywords that would mark it for that of a mobile device. I’ll return on this point in a moment.

Listing Current Display Modes

You hardly have the need to do this in code, but I encourage you to try that out for pure fun. Here’s the code that reads and displays the currently available modes:

<ul>
    @{
        foreach(var d in DisplayModeProvider.Instance.Modes)
        {
            <li>@(String.IsNullOrEmpty(d.DisplayModeId) ?"default" :d.DisplayModeId)</li>
        }
    }
</ul>

You use the Instance static member to access the singleton instance of the DisplayModeProvider class and flip through the Modes property. By the way, the getter of the Modes property just returns the value stored in the internal _displayModes field dissected earlier through .NET Reflector.

Beyond the Default Configuration

The default and mobile display modes come free out of the box, but honestly they are not worth the cost. I have two reasons to say this. First, modern web sites need more than just a mobile/desktop dichotomy for views. You might want to distinguish tablets, smartphones, legacy phones, perhaps smart TVs. Sometimes this can be achieved with CSS media queries; sometimes you need to do server-side detection of the device via its provided user agent string. This leads to the second reason I have to blissfully ignore the default ASP.NET MVC configuration. Even if a plain desktop/mobile dichotomy works for your site, the point is that the logic behind the mobile context condition is weak and flaky. It has good chances to work with iPhone and BlackBerry devices; it may not even work with Windows Phone and Android devices—let alone with older and simpler devices. The method IsMobileDevice you have seen referenced a while back does sniffing of the user agent string based on the information it can find in the following .browser files you get installed with ASP.NET.

The model is clearly extensible and you can add more information at any time; but writing a .browser file may not be easy and the burden of testing, checking, and further extending the database is entirely on your shoulders.

The figure proves that I added a fairly large (18 MB) browser file—an XML file actually—named mobile.browser. That file comes from an old Microsoft project now discontinued and contains a reasonable amount of devices as of summer of 2011. All devices and browsers which came next are not correctly detected.

In the end, display modes are an excellent piece of infrastructure but require a bit of work on your end for configuration and additional tools to do view routing work effectively. The siren call about ASP.NET MVC being fully mobile aware is just a siren call.

What Can You Do About It?

You use display modes to give your site multiple views in front of the same URL. More concretely, this mostly means using defining a display mode for each device, or class of devices, you’re interested in. You could create an iPhone display mode for example. Likewise, you could create a tablet display mode. Here’s some code:

var modeTablet = new DefaultDisplayMode("tablet")

{
   ContextCondition = (c => IsTablet(c.Request))
};var modeDesktop = new DefaultDisplayMode("")
{
   ContextCondition = (c => return true)
};
displayModes.Clear();
displayModes.Add(modeTablet);
displayModes.Add(modeDesktop);

When run from Application_Start, the code drops default modes and defines two new modes: tablet and desktop. The tablet mode is added first and will be checked first. The internal logic that finds the appropriate display mode, in fact, stops at first match. If the HTTP request is not matched to a tablet, it is then treated by default with a view optimized for a desktop device.

How would you reliably determine whether a given request comes from a tablet? It’s all about sniffing the user agent string; but you need a professional tool for that. The answer is getting a commercial license from a Device Description Repository vendor like ScientiaMobile for WURFL. Note that WURFL is only the most widely used (Facebook and Google use it) device database; it is free for open source projects and has a partly free cloud version. Other products exist too. But my point here is that you should not spend a second on crafting your own solution for sniffing user agent strings.

 



ASP.NET MVC Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: Make a Captcha Image Validation with Jquery and MVC

clock January 28, 2013 09:37 by author Jervis

The code snippets below show how to use a simple class. To create a validation mechanism via captcha in ASP.Net , using Jquery and MVC. 

Using the code  

The code consists of two parts that work together to make the code work.

The first in javascript that runs on the client and should be placed on the page header, is responsible for making the request to the server. 

Note: I must remember that this javascript code requires Jquery, which can be downloaded here

   <script type="text/javascript" language="javascript">
        $(document).ready(function () {
            loadCaptcha();
        });
        function loadCaptcha() {
            $.ajax({
                type: 'GET', url: 'Home/generateCaptcha',
                contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
                dataType: "json",
                cache: false,
                success: function (data) { $("#m_imgCaptcha").attr('src', data); },
                error: function (data) { alert("Error while loading captcha image") }
            });
        }
    </script>

The second in C# runs  on the server.

That Receives the request from the page, generates an image with the specified text, this text can be generated by a function embedded in class or can be specified by the developer. The text is saved in the Session and is used to validate the data entered by the user. 

public ActionResult generateCaptcha()
        {
            System.Drawing.FontFamily family = new System.Drawing.FontFamily("Arial");
            CaptchaImage img = new CaptchaImage(150, 50, family);
            string text = img.CreateRandomText(4) + " " + img.CreateRandomText(3);
            img.SetText(text);
            img.GenerateImage();
            img.Image.Save(Server.MapPath("~") + this.Session.SessionID.ToString() + ".png", System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Png);
            Session["captchaText"] = text;
            return Json(this.Session.SessionID.ToString() + ".png?t=" + DateTime.Now.Ticks, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
        }

Here is an example of a captcha image generated using this code.

Advantages of use

You know what's running on your server.

No special settings are needed.

Is not necessary use third party components that can fail.

It is fully customizable. 

 



ASP.NET MVC Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: Create ASP.NET MVC Localization with Language Detection

clock January 6, 2011 05:09 by author Jervis

In this tutorial I will show a simple way to create localization (globalization) for web application using APS.NET MVC framework. It should work fine with MVC 1 and 2 and I’m currently using .NET 3.5 SP1, but .NET 4.0 will work as well. All code is in C# and for language translations I use XML files.

Language files with XML


For translations of different languages I use simple xml files. I store them in App_Data/messages/<locale>.xml, for example en-US.xml or de-DE.xml. Here is the xml structure:

<items>
  <item key="home">Home</item>
  <item key="products">Products</item>
  <item key="services">Services</item>
</items>

You should have identical language files for all desired languages. All translation items should be the same (with equal “key” attributes).

Create Translator class

Main translation work will be done by Translator singleton class. Create “Infrastructure” folder in your MVC project and put class Translator there.
First, let’s make class singleton:


private static Translator instance = null;
public static Translator Instance
{
    get
    {
        if (instance == null)
        {
            instance = new Translator();
        }
        return instance;
    }
}
private Translator() { }

Add the following fields and properties to the class:

private static string[] cultures = { "en-US", "bg-BG" };
private string locale = string.Empty;

public string Locale
{
    get
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(locale))
        {
            throw new Exception("Locale not set");
        }
        else
        {
            return locale;
        }
    }
    set
    {
        if (Cultures.Contains(value))
        {
            locale = value;
            load();
        }
        else
        {
            throw new Exception("Invalid locale");
        }
    }
}

public static string[] Cultures
{
    get
    {
        return cultures;
    }
}

Field "cultures" lists available cultures. "Locale" keeps current culture. And in "set" part of Locale property you can see invocation of load() method. I will talk about it later.
To keep localization data I will create simple dictionary and then use keys from XML for dictionary keys and XML item values as dictionary values. Simple Translate method will do translation job. I have indexer method for easy access.


private Dictionary data = null;

public string Translate(string key)
{
    if (data != null && data.ContainsKey(key))
    {
        return data[key];
    }
    else
    {
        return ":" + key + ":";
    }
}

public string this[string key]
{
    get
    {
        return Translate(key);
    }
}

If some key cannot be found and translated, I return the key with ":" around it, so you can easy find untranslated items.
Finally, for loading XML I use LINQ to XML. I have static caching dictionary, so I don't need reading XML on every request.


private static Dictionary<string, Dictionary<string, string>> cache =
  new Dictionary<string, Dictionary<string, string>>();

private void load()
{
    if (cache.ContainsKey(locale) == false) // CACHE MISS !
    {
        var doc = XDocument.Load(
            HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath(
               "~/App_Data/messages/" + locale + ".xml"))

        cache[locale] = (from item in doc.Descendants("item")
                         where item.Attribute("key") != null
                         select new
                         {
                             Key = item.Attribute("key").Value,
                             Data = item.Value,
                         }).ToDictionary(i => i.Key, i => i.Data);
    }

    data = cache[locale];
}

public static void ClearCache()
{
    cache = new Dictionary<string, Dictionary<string, string>>();
}

You can use translator in your controller like this:
Translator.Instance[key];
After load() methid I have ClearCache method for easy developing (you know, once read, data is cached and you have to restart IIS Application Pool to refresh localization data).
Translator class is ready, I will show you how to use it later.


Create localization helpers

Create static class LocalizationHelpers and put it in "Helpers" folder in your project.

public static string CurrentCulture(this HtmlHelper html)
{
    return Translator.Instance.Locale;
}

public static string T(this HtmlHelper html, string key)
{
    return html.Encode(Translator.Instance[key]);
}

public static string T(this HtmlHelper html, string key,
    params object[] args)
{
    return html.Encode(string.Format(
        Translator.Instance[key], args));
}

I will use this in html views for translation like this

<%= Html.T("products") %>

If you want params in translated values you can use second T implementation like string.Format. First helper CurrentCulture is used in language select user control to determine current culture.

Create BaseController class

Create BaseController class that extends Controller and put it in "Infrastructure" folder of your MVC project. You should extend all your controller classes from this class. Create simple property for current selected culture (locale)

public string CurrentCulture
{
    get
    {
        return Translator.Instance.Locale;
    }
}

You will use this in your controller when you initialize your model, for example.
In the following code I will explain language detection and saving with cookie.


private void initCulture(RequestContext requestContext)
{
    string cultureCode = getCulture(requestContext.HttpContext);

    requestContext.HttpContext.Response.Cookies.Add(
        new HttpCookie("Culture", cultureCode)
        {
            Expires = DateTime.Now.AddYears(1),
            HttpOnly = true,
        }
    );

    Translator.Instance.Locale = cultureCode;

    CultureInfo culture = new CultureInfo(cultureCode);
    System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = culture;
    System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = culture;
}

private string getCulture(HttpContextBase context)
{
    string code = getCookieCulture(context);

    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(code))
    {
        code = getCountryCulture(context);
    }

    return code;
}

private string getCookieCulture(HttpContextBase context)
{
    HttpCookie cookie = context.Request.Cookies["Culture"];

    if (cookie == null || string.IsNullOrEmpty(cookie.Value) ||
         !Translator.Cultures.Contains(cookie.Value))
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }

    return cookie.Value;
}

private string getCountryCulture(HttpContextBase context)
{
    // some GeoIp magic here
    return "en-US";
}

First I try to get language cookie if there is any (if this is not first time visit). If there is no cookie you can detect browser language, make GeoIP IP address lookup and so on. After finding some valid locale/culture I set response cookie for next page visits. After this I change current thread culture. This is useful if you want to format some date or currency values.
You should call initCulture in overridden Initialize method.


Changes in HomeController

Don't forget to change parent class of all your controller to BaseController. Add following code to your HomeController, so you can change current culture. When you open specified URL, a cookie is set and user is redirected to index page. This URL is like example.com/home/culture/en-US. Clear cache method is for deleting current cache without restarting application pool. Access it with example.com/home/ClearLanguageCache.

public ActionResult Culture(string id)

{
    HttpCookie cookie = Request.Cookies["Culture"];
    cookie.Value = id;
    cookie.Expires = DateTime.Now.AddYears(1);
    Response.SetCookie(cookie);

    return Redirect("/");
}

public ActionResult ClearLanguageCache(string id)
{
    Translator.ClearCache();

    return Redirect("/");
}

To change current language I will create special user control which will be included in may Master.Site layout. Create CultureUserControl.ascx and put it in Views/Shared/ folder of your MVC project. Here is the code:

<%@ Control Language="C#" Inherits="System.Web.Mvc.ViewUserControl" %>

<% if (Html.CurrentCulture() == "bg-BG") { %>
    <a id="lang" href="/home/culture/en-US">en</a>
<% } else { %>
    <a id="lang" href="/home/culture/bg-BG">bg</a>
<% } %>

In my layout I use <% Html.RenderPartial("CultureUserControl"); %> to include it.

Conclusion

In this simple tutorial I've created localization infrastructure for ASP.NET MVC web application. Translations of different languages are stored in XML files. Then I use Translator class to load them. Current user culture is kept in cookie. You can access Translator class in html views using some helpers. Also all the translation data i cached so it will not be loaded form XML every request.
Hope this tutorial helps.


Reasons why you must trust ASPHostPortal.com

Every provider will tell you how they treat their support, uptime, expertise, guarantees, etc., are. Take a close look. What they’re really offering you is nothing close to what ASPHostPortal does. You will be treated with respect and provided the courtesy and service you would expect from a world-class web hosting business.

You’ll have highly trained, skilled professional technical support people ready, willing, and wanting to help you 24 hours a day. Your web hosting account servers are monitored from three monitoring points, with two alert points, every minute, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. The followings are the list of other added- benefits you can find when hosting with us:

- DELL Hardware
Dell hardware is engineered to keep critical enterprise applications running around the clock with clustered solutions fully tested and certified by Dell and other leading operating system and application providers.
- Recovery Systems
Recovery becomes easy and seamless with our fully managed backup services. We monitor your server to ensure your data is properly backed up and recoverable so when the time comes, you can easily repair or recover your data.
- Control Panel
We provide one of the most comprehensive customer control panels available. Providing maximum control and ease of use, our Control Panel serves as the central management point for your ASPHostPortal account. You’ll use a flexible, powerful hosting control panel that will give you direct control over your web hosting account. Our control panel and systems configuration is fully automated and this means your settings are configured automatically and instantly.
- Excellent Expertise in Technology
The reason we can provide you with a great amount of power, flexibility, and simplicity at such a discounted price is due to incredible efficiencies within our business. We have not just been providing hosting for many clients for years, we have also been researching, developing, and innovating every aspect of our operations, systems, procedures, strategy, management, and teams. Our operations are based on a continual improvement program where we review thousands of systems, operational and management metrics in real-time, to fine-tune every aspect of our operation and activities. We continually train and retrain all people in our teams. We provide all people in our teams with the time, space, and inspiration to research, understand, and explore the Internet in search of greater knowledge. We do this while providing you with the best hosting services for the lowest possible price.
- Data Center
ASPHostPortal modular Tier-3 data center was specifically designed to be a world-class web hosting facility totally dedicated to uncompromised performance and security
- Monitoring Services
From the moment your server is connected to our network it is monitored for connectivity, disk, memory and CPU utilization – as well as hardware failures. Our engineers are alerted to potential issues before they become critical.
- Network
ASPHostPortal has architected its network like no other hosting company. Every facet of our network infrastructure scales to gigabit speeds with no single point of failure.
- Security
Network security and the security of your server are ASPHostPortal’s top priorities. Our security team is constantly monitoring the entire network for unusual or suspicious behavior so that when it is detected we can address the issue before our network or your server is affected.
- Support Services
Engineers staff our data center 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year to manage the network infrastructure and oversee top-of-the-line servers that host our clients’ critical sites and services.



ASP.NET MVC 2 Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: Client-Side Validation with jQuery, DataAnnotations, MVC 2, and VS2010 Beta 2

clock November 5, 2010 07:13 by author Jervis

Instead of having to maintain simple validation logic in two places (your business classes and your jQuery code), you can now use the Data Annotations attributes and metadata "buddy" classes to decorate your models. Those decorated models will automatically generate the appropriate jQuery code to enforce all of your validation rules on the client side before the form is ever submitted. Let's see how this works.

First, we need a model class. Let's do something simple like Customer:

public partial class Customer
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}


This is great. I love the fact that it doesn't look ugly and view developers can look at it and immediately know what fields are available and they don't need to sift through a pile of persistence garbage or validation logic. You might have noticed that I've made this class partial. The reason I'm doing this is because I'm going to create another file called Customer.metadata.cs. There are other samples on the web that don't do this, but I like cleanly separating the definition of my model from the validation logic for that model. Here's a look at my Customer.metadata.cs file:

[MetadataType(typeof(CustomerMetaData))]
public partial class Customer
{
    class CustomerMetaData
    {
        [Required(ErrorMessage="You must supply a name for a customer.")]
        [StringLength(50, ErrorMessage = "A customer name cannot exceed 50 characters.")]
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}


What I've done here is used a metadata "buddy class" (that's what posts from Scott Guthrie and Scott Hanselman have been calling them, so I'm sticking with convention here). This buddy class is a placeholder for all my validation logic attributes and the runtime will then merge all this stuff onto the actual model. MVC 2 will then examine the model and , with a few lines of code in the view, generate the appropriate jQuery client-side validation logic.

In your view code, add the following 3 script declarations:

<script type="text/javascript" src="../../Scripts/jquery-1.3.2.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="../../Scripts/jquery.validate.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="../../Scripts/MicrosoftMvcJQueryValidation.js"></script>

Finally, somewhere before the start of your form tag, add the following markup to the view code:

<% Html.EnableClientValidation(); %>

This will invoke the code that reads through the strongly typed model for your view, figures out all of the validation logic that applies, and generates the appropriate jQuery code.

While you could write your own jQuery validation code if you felt like it, using data annotations and MVC 2, you no longer have to maintain your validation logic in two places. The attributes apply to a single view model and all you have to do is change one of those attributes and the generated jQuery code will change as well. This is a huge timesaver and promises to dramatically increase overall productivity of developers building large-scale MVC 2 applications, especially LOB apps with lots of data entry forms.

Reasons why you must trust ASPHostPortal.com

Every provider will tell you how they treat their support, uptime, expertise, guarantees, etc., are. Take a close look. What they’re really offering you is nothing close to what ASPHostPortal does. You will be treated with respect and provided the courtesy and service you would expect from a world-class web hosting business.

You’ll have highly trained, skilled professional technical support people ready, willing, and wanting to help you 24 hours a day. Your web hosting account servers are monitored from three monitoring points, with two alert points, every minute, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. The followings are the list of other added- benefits you can find when hosting with us:

- DELL Hardware
Dell hardware is engineered to keep critical enterprise applications running around the clock with clustered solutions fully tested and certified by Dell and other leading operating system and application providers.
- Recovery Systems
Recovery becomes easy and seamless with our fully managed backup services. We monitor your server to ensure your data is properly backed up and recoverable so when the time comes, you can easily repair or recover your data.
- Control Panel
We provide one of the most comprehensive customer control panels available. Providing maximum control and ease of use, our Control Panel serves as the central management point for your ASPHostPortal account. You’ll use a flexible, powerful hosting control panel that will give you direct control over your web hosting account. Our control panel and systems configuration is fully automated and this means your settings are configured automatically and instantly.
- Excellent Expertise in Technology
The reason we can provide you with a great amount of power, flexibility, and simplicity at such a discounted price is due to incredible efficiencies within our business. We have not just been providing hosting for many clients for years, we have also been researching, developing, and innovating every aspect of our operations, systems, procedures, strategy, management, and teams. Our operations are based on a continual improvement program where we review thousands of systems, operational and management metrics in real-time, to fine-tune every aspect of our operation and activities. We continually train and retrain all people in our teams. We provide all people in our teams with the time, space, and inspiration to research, understand, and explore the Internet in search of greater knowledge. We do this while providing you with the best hosting services for the lowest possible price.
- Data Center
ASPHostPortal modular Tier-3 data center was specifically designed to be a world-class web hosting facility totally dedicated to uncompromised performance and security
- Monitoring Services
From the moment your server is connected to our network it is monitored for connectivity, disk, memory and CPU utilization – as well as hardware failures. Our engineers are alerted to potential issues before they become critical.
- Network
ASPHostPortal has architected its network like no other hosting company. Every facet of our network infrastructure scales to gigabit speeds with no single point of failure.
- Security
Network security and the security of your server are ASPHostPortal’s top priorities. Our security team is constantly monitoring the entire network for unusual or suspicious behavior so that when it is detected we can address the issue before our network or your server is affected.
- Support Services
Engineers staff our data center 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year to manage the network infrastructure and oversee top-of-the-line servers that host our clients’ critical sites and services.



About ASPHostPortal.com

We’re a company that works differently to most. Value is what we output and help our customers achieve, not how much money we put in the bank. It’s not because we are altruistic. It’s based on an even simpler principle. "Do good things, and good things will come to you".

Success for us is something that is continually experienced, not something that is reached. For us it is all about the experience – more than the journey. Life is a continual experience. We see the Internet as being an incredible amplifier to the experience of life for all of us. It can help humanity come together to explode in knowledge exploration and discussion. It is continual enlightenment of new ideas, experiences, and passions


Author Link


Corporate Address (Location)

ASPHostPortal
170 W 56th Street, Suite 121
New York, NY 10019
United States

Sign in